The economics of beer

What are the economics of a 12 pack?

Brooklyn Brewery sells a mixed 12-pack with four different beers in it–Brown Ale, Pennant Ale, East India Pale Ale, and and Lager. So, you would think you would get 3 of each, right? Nope.

The sampler contains four Brown Ales, four Lagers, two Pennant Ales, and two East India Ales.  Weird, huh? So, are Pennant and East India premium and thus that is why you only get two?  In six-packs all of the styles of beer are the same price (at our local store), $8.49.

Are they ripping us off or have they found a creative way to give us an extra style of beer in the sampler?

  • Beeronomics.
  • The economics of beer drinking.
  • As for India pale ale (IPA), it was created out of necessity. In the 18th century, England established a military and trading presence in India, and that meant many hot, thirsty Brits craved the quench of their native beer. However, when the motherland exported beer to India, six months on the high seas tended to render it sour, flat, and the opposite of refreshing. In order to better preserve the beer, brewers increased the hops and the alcohol content of their pale ales. Refreshment received. IPA was born.
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6 Responses

  1. Pale ale seems to have higher alcohol and perhaps they would price te six packs differently but the consistent pricing just makes the business model easier.

  2. Maybe they brewed a larger batch of the Brown Ale and Lager and take that into consideration when they’re packing the 12 packs. There’s really only one way to find out: a field trip to the Brooklyn Brewery for a tour and Q&A.

    • the tour is not worth the 45 minutes that you stand there and hear someone basically read the history of the company that is on the website or wikipedia. on the other hand the brewery itself is awesome but no free samples of the beer

  3. Maybe in polls Brown Ale and Lager does better so they put more of them in so that the customer satisfaction for the overall experience of the mixed 12 pack is positive?

  4. I always thought India pale ale just didn’t have to age (ferment) as long because it would age on the ship in theory. The added hops is likely the added cost.

  5. […] 14. The economics of beer […]

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